The Old Man and the Sea

Rochelle Wisoff-Fields invites us weekly to join the Friday Fictioneers in their creative quests of a hundred words or less, prompted by a photo. Click on the frog to join in!
 
 
PHOTO PROMPT © CEAyr

The Old Man and the Sea

“Bleu, bleu, l’amour est bleu,” crooned the old man beneath his cap
Remembering the promise he had failed to keep as a lad of nineteen
He stood before the sea, and his heart surged piteously
Remembering the promise he had failed to keep as a man of thirty-two
“Comme l’eau, comme l’eau qui court,” sang he, wading into surf
Remembering the promise he had failed to keep as a cavalier of fifty-four
His blood ran cold as a sea-voice joined in
“Fou comme toi et fou comme moi,”
then down he went
in a sea-embrace
till he sang
no
more.

Click here for the English translation to “L’amour est bleu”; Paul Meriat’s instrumental version in 1967 was the only number-one hit by a French lead artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 in America. 

Author: Dora

The unearned splendor of being means we can always meet on a common plane of gratitude, aiming in conversation, art, or writing towards “something understood.”

61 thoughts on “The Old Man and the Sea”

        1. How humbling to know our Lord led you to do so! Yes, I have been in need of extra prayers and I have been calmed today, to walk in trust not fear into a process that will take the next few months to resolve. Times like these I hang on to Romans 8:28 with both my hands and all my heart! All thanks be to our Lord for your prayers, for your listening to His voice. ❤️ God bless you, my dear.

          Liked by 4 people

    1. Haha! I had to sing it for a junior high school performance as part of a quartet. Every once in a while I’ll think of that and shiver with remembered horror! But it really is an unforgettable song. ❤️😀

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I was singing along as I read. The benefits of being a French Quebecer 🙂
    Now as to the story, I don’t know why I don’t feel sad for him, though too much regret has taken over. Somehow I feel he will find peace now.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m with you, I can’t pity him too much, but I do think he’s gone to his reward for sure. I got a kick out of your singing along – Now that makes me smile! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I liked that your song is in French, Dora, as the photo shows the Mediterranean Sea and a section of beach on the Côte d’Azur.
    And slipping into these beautiful waters sounds to me like a pretty good way to go…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s a beautiful photograph , C.E., and I enjoyed working with it and I’m more than a little blown away that it’s coincidentally a beach in France! Ye muses! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Rochelle,

      Thank you Rochelle. It’s a kick to do the reading and I’m so glad you enjoy it especially as I’ve always enjoyed yours. As for making it a habit? I’ll surprise you. 😀

      Aleichem shalom,
      Dora

      Liked by 2 people

  3. “Fou comme toi et fou comme moi,” You place this sentence really well. From this point on, the old man’s death is inevitable. Reading it gave me a real chill. The whole story is an excellent emotional evocation of the despair that accompanies guilt.

    Liked by 2 people

I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s