Moon Dragon

Image by Manweri

In the sky through the clouds you can see silver haze
Dispersed like the sheen of a dragon of steel
Look too long and you’ll swear that your gaze
Is returned and the dragon above sees its prey.

Do not run, do not hide, or you’ll be her next meal
Say charms, not too loud, dance a jig, maybe two
If the fear in your eyes, it can see, it can feel
Then no magic on earth can save you or save me

As she comes, whisper soft, murmur tales of lost love
Spin dreams of a land where a knight stays true blue
Melt her heart, let her eyes fill with tears, and above
Your bent head she will breathe not her fire, but her cheer.

Then your heart it will swell, you will ask all you will,
Deep lore of the earth, wondrous songs of the sea
All to you she’ll impart, from her lips it will spill
Then she’ll fly to her lair over clouds over moons.


BJÖRN RUDBERG at dVerse challenges us today to write our verse in Anapestic Tetrameter, and so I’ve attempted, with a dropped syllable in each quatrain’s second line. See more dVerse offering and join in by clicking on Mr. Linky.

33 thoughts on “Moon Dragon”

  1. Magical, Dora. I love the way the rhythm in these lines evokes fear, like a heartbeat:
    ‘Do not run, do not hide, or you’ll be her next meal
    Say charms, not too loud, dance a jig, maybe two
    If the fear in your eyes, it can see, it can feel
    Then no magic on earth can save you or save me’.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the idea of charming the dragon and you’ve given a good how-to in your poem. I have to wonder why, when any sensible creature would be fearful, the expectation is if you feel fear you’re doomed? It’s been played out in a million fairy tales, and fairy tales are the transmitters of cultural norms, so why is the culture trying to say denial is what’s expected?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Interesting question, Lisa. I wonder, too, and the closest I can come to an answer is that when we are confronted by bullies (who hasn’t been?), SHOWING fear seems to egg them on and victimizes you further. Fighting back and disguising your fear makes you less prone to be victimized again. Perhaps this is what the old tales mean to say. Especially to children.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Björn. You put it so well: “being on the right side of danger” has that universal mythic dimension. Danger and magic seem to be natural partners.

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