The Disappearing Man (story)

Genre: Fiction
Word Count: 100

The Disappearing Man

For the hundredth time, he recognizes this as the moment he loses her.

She looks out the window at the restless pecking of a wren, relaxes into its movements.

He sees the colors drain from his world, like an old timey flick on a spool ticking the moments until the screen fades into flecks of black and then, THE END.

It’s the moment to bow out, without fuss. It’s just a social experiment, marriage, though it’s lasted five years.

“Let’s skip the play and stay home,” she says, turning, and he, seeing the colors return, says, “I’m not going anywhere.”


For Rochelle's Friday Fictioneers, 100 words or less using photo prompt; image credit: Dale Rogerson; and Denise's Six Sentence Story, prompt word "play"

Author: dorahak

The unearned splendor of being means we can always meet on a common plane of gratitude, aiming in conversation, art, and writing towards (as poet George Herbert said) “something understood.”

50 thoughts on “The Disappearing Man (story)”

  1. I enjoyed the back and forth between the description of your two protagonists. It was choreographed nicely with lots to be guessed instead of showing. And in only 100 words!

    Like

  2. A somewhat poignant story, Dora. In my mind, the title suggests the man suffers from some sort of cognitive ailment, dementia perhaps. Heartbreaking.
    On the other hand, your story resonates with a sense the couple is not quite attuned to one another; perhaps time is needed to learn the deeper nuances of their relationship. Or, it might simply be an example of how our insecurities have a way of coloring our perspective.

    Like

    1. I left it a little enigmatic, it’s true. All those suggestions ring true to be honest. What’s going on in his mind is up in the air. Thanks for the great feedback Denise! 💞💞💞

      Liked by 1 person

I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: